Irish Coinage

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The Great Rebellion

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The Great Rebellion and the English Civil War (1640-1650)

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Index


Inchiquin Money
Ormond Money


2002 - Copyright
John
_Stafford-Langan
Version 1.10
14 September, 2000

   

Introduction.


 

 

 

During the period of the Great Rebellion in Ireland and the English Civil War a number of crudely made local coinages were produced in Ireland, mostly in Dublin.

These coinage were almost exclusively of silver plate cut and struck into a number of denominations with simple patterns including often their weight or value.

Most common among these issues is the 'Ormond Money' issued by the Lord Justice the Earl of Ormond in about 1642-1645 and the Blacksmith's Money which consisted of crude Irish halfcrowns of essentially English design.

Among the rarer issues of this period are the pistole and double pistole of 1646. Which are the only gold coins struck in Ireland (excluding a number of proofs struck in gold over the years and some recent ecu patterns).

Inchiquin Money

There were three 1642 issues:

All three issues are also collectively known as 'Inchiquin Money' which does cause confusion with the first issue. It was originally believe that these coins were issued by Lord Inchiquin, but their issue by the Lord Justices in 1642 is now well established.

Issue 1 - 'Inchiquin Money' with the coin's weight in dwt and gr (pennyweights and grains) on each side. Issued in 6 denominations. Crown down to Groat.

Issue 2 - 'Annulet Money' with the coin's weight in dwt and gr (pennyweights and grains) on one side and teh value in pence represented by a number of annulets on the other side. Issued in 4 denominations : 9d, 6d, 4d and 3d.

Issue 3 - 'Dublin Money' with the coin's value in shillings and pence on each side. Only Crown (Vs) and Half Crown (IIsVId) issued.


Inchiquin - Dublin Money - Crown

Ormond Money

The 1642 issue was followed in 1643 by a larger issue of better made, but still crude, silver coins. These are known as Ormond Money.

 


An Ormond Crown of 1643-44

 

 

 

During the period of the Great Rebellion in Ireland and the English Civil War a number of crudely made local coinages were produced in Ireland, mostly in Dublin.

These coinage were almost exclusively of silver plate cut and struck into a number of denominations with simple patterns including often their weight or value.

Most common among these issues is the 'Ormond Money' issued by the Lord Justice the Earl of Ormond in about 1642-1645 and the Blacksmith's Money which consisted of crude Irish halfcrowns of essentially English design.

Among the rarer issues of this period are the pistole and double pistole of 1646. Which are the only gold coins struck in Ireland (excluding a number of proofs struck in gold over the years and some recent ecu patterns).